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Origins.

We are not just talking about what’s in your cup every morning, we are talking about a whole process of choices to make it perfect. And this starts from the very beginning.
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Where does coffee come from?

Coffee is produced across the world in “The Coffee Belt”, a particular band of tropical regions that runs along the Equator.
​​​​​​​ The two most important coffee-producing countries are Brazil for Arabica and Vietnam for Robusta. In the American continent, they are Colombia, Guatemala, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Puerto Rico, Cuba and Mexico. Ethiopia is widely accepted as the birthplace of coffee which produces an excellent quality of washed and natural Arabica. In Africa: Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda and the Ivory Coast, better known for their production of Robusta.
​​​​​​​ On the Asian continent, India and Indonesia produce both Arabica and Robusta.
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Different origins, different flavours.

​​Many different varieties are produced from Arabica and/or Robusta beans. Ethiopia and Tanzania produce quality beans that are ideal for roasting specifically for espresso coffee. The Ethiopian coffee in cup has strong aromas of citrus and jasmine, flowery notes with a sweet and pleasantly acidic taste. The Tanzanian one is sweet and sour, with aromatic notes of caramel, fresh fruit and citrus. The Indian coffee in cup has a bitter-sweet taste that leaves hints of chocolate and biscuit on the palate. The Guatemalan one is sweet, slightly acidic, full-bodied with aromatic notes of chocolate, honey, caramel and citrus fruits. The coffee in cup from El Salvador has a sweet, sour flavour with fruity and caramel aromatic notes. The Costa Rican one has strong aromas of orange, chocolate, caramel, honey and vanilla and a sweetly smooth taste in cup. The Colombian coffee in cup has an acid-sweet-bitter balance, as well as a good body with aromatic notes of caramel, chocolate, fruit and dried fruit that add wonderful complexity.
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Each bean carries the love of its roaster.

Each coffee roasting process is unique, complex and often tailored around the roaster’s personal technique. By varying the timeframes and temperatures of the roasts, experienced roasters can create the most diverse coffee profiles to satisfy many different flavour palettes.
The three main phases of coffee roasting are:
The Drying phase: the seed loses most of its free moisture content and becomes yellow/cinnamon in colour;
The Roasting phase: the most important chemical reactions occur and the seed takes on the distinctive brown colour;
​​​​​​​ The Cooling phase: the roasting process is interrupted, and the bean is brought back to room temperature.
Single origins & blends. What does this even mean? Let’s see some useful terms.
  • Single origin.
    Single origin. The term single origin means that the beans come from one place only, usually from a certain country, region or even the same farm or estate. Many purists argue that it’s important not to destroy its essence by mixing it carelessly with another.
  • Specialty coffees.
    Specialty coffees.  Term used to describe a superior coffee experience. Specialty roasters use single origin beans to offer coffees that taste very different from each other throughout the year to provide a unique experience in the cup.
  • Coffee blends.
    Coffee blends. Term used to describe a superior coffee experience. Specialty roasters use single origin beans to offer coffees that taste very different from each other throughout the year to provide a unique experience in the cup.
Single origin.
Specialty coffees.
Coffee blends.
  • Single origin. The term single origin means that the beans come from one place only, usually from a certain country, region or even the same farm or estate. Many purists argue that it’s important not to destroy its essence by mixing it carelessly with another.
  • Specialty coffees.  Term used to describe a superior coffee experience. Specialty roasters use single origin beans to offer coffees that taste very different from each other throughout the year to provide a unique experience in the cup.
  • Coffee blends. Term used to describe a superior coffee experience. Specialty roasters use single origin beans to offer coffees that taste very different from each other throughout the year to provide a unique experience in the cup.

Coffee taste? It’s also in the processing.

Coffee flavour varies depending on whether beans are Arabica or Robusta, but also based on whether they are natural or wet. With the natural method, the coffee fruit is left to dry evenly in the sun, then the dried pulp is “peeled off". With the wet method, the beans are placed in tanks of water, then they are re-washed and dried in the sun, as a result the flavour in the cup is more acidic and complex.
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How to choose the ideal bean for you. Here’s a brief guide on how to pick the best coffee beans for your specific taste.

Tap to start
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Replay
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Freshness: Freshness doesn’t keep forever. For maximum enjoyment, it is better to buy the freshest roasted beans possible and to finish them no later than three weeks after the printed roast date.
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Coffee Type: The choice of coffee type is subjective, but as a general rule, most coffee experts agree that blended coffee beans are best for coffee with milk and single origin is best for a black beverage.
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Origin Selection: Coffee grows in a narrow subtropical “coffee belt” that stretches around the world, giving rise to a vast array of geographical and temperate variables, which will alter the outcome of the coffee’s flavour.
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Varieties: As a fruit, coffee comes in many different varieties. The most common ones are Bourbon, Typica and Caturra, while the Geisha variety is one of the most sought after on the planet.
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Altitude: The growing altitude of the beans has an impact on the sweetness and acidity of the cherries. Sugar is an energy source for a coffee plant and if this is cultivated in a harsh environment, it will use more sugar to survive, so less ends up in the final bean.